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  • #17721
    Ralph Spracklin
    CVRS Member

    Happy New Year to All

    Hey Dan! Lots of battle scars on that one. I have to admit that your cabinet refinishing seems super excellent. But for those who have less experience in refinishing I make this short post. Anyway, how do you or most of you strip old finish away? Using harsh Chemicals is not very friendly, as it is so goopy and toxic. It is also messy and hard to clean up. Sanding large surfaces is also very messy, and dangerous if completed in close quarters or inside the house, as the dust gets pulled through the house by HVAC Systems. For most finishes on radios, especially if it is varnish. I suggest that one take it outside or to the garage, put on a mask, (no shortage of mask these days) eye protection,, and just scrape the surface away using a Olfa utility blade on its side, scraping in the direction of the grain. You can cover most of the surface of the blade with masking or electrical tape to reduce the danger of accidental cuts to the hands, or you can put a slit in a small block of wood into which you can slide the blade, making it snug in the block of wood, again using some masking tape. This is how I stripped my 6D531 radio quite easily and in good time. No mess! No Fuss! You can also a regular paint scraper whose edges are clean and without nicks or bracks, which can damage the surface. I find that the Olfa blades are less invasive. Afterwards, all I had to do was sweep the garage floor and wash it all away with the garden hose. I have not tried this on Shellac or other finishes. Although it may work very well on Shellac. A light sanding, and barring any other surface repairs it is ready for refinishing. It seems to me that varnish just clings to and just sits on the surfaces without being absorbed into the wood finish . This of course will not work on arborite type laminate or plastisized type surfaces. Brushed on varnish does not level well. It usually need to be applied and wiped of after a few minutes. This allows it to dry faster, thus picking up less airborne dust, leaving a smoother finish. Learn more about wiping and hand-rubbed varnish finishes on Google. And note that sometimes, two types of finishes can be used by the manufacturer on a radio surface.

    Ralph

    #17722
    Dan Walker
    CVRS Member

    https://www.antiqueradios.com/features/lacquer.html
    Ralph: This is the basic method I use for refinishing my cabinets.
    I say basic, because I change things a bit . I don’t use wood chips.
    I use a strong commercial stripper——$80.00 a gallon. I want to get ALL the old finish off.
    The heavy stripper is used when the old finish is on pretty good. Usually I use the 50-50 mixture of lacquer thinner and acetone
    for stripping. I do this in the summer ,outside in the garage.
    I can usually get five to seven console radios done in the summer, depending on how much wood repair I have to do.

    I guess it is a personal preference on what you use to strip the cabinets, but I have never scraped the cabinets,
    and I don’t sand them either.
    Each to his own. Here are a couple of photos of one RCA radio
    Dan

    #17851
    Andrew Shinn
    CVRS Member

    Hi Ralph, I am interested in how the transformer winding is going, also could you show us your winding apparatus I would like to see that as I am considering winding some transformers.

    #17852
    Ralph Spracklin
    CVRS Member

    Morning Andrew
    Thanks for your reply. I still have not started the rewind, as I have too many other projects in the works at this time. A Westinghouse W780Y, a Marconi Model 51, and of course my DeForest Crosley 6D531. All for complete restoration. Sometimes, as they say, I bite off more than I can chew. Anyway am getting closer to doing the actual re-winding process.

    I will set up my apparatus and take a few pictures to give you an idea of what and how my process and apparatus works.This may take a few days, but I wll get to it. I really like the mechanical counter I use, as it is very accurate at higher speeds. I do not usually operate at higher speeds, as I am afraid that, sometimes… “Haste makes Waste” I picked up this counter at Princess Auto, for around $20.00.

    I would also appreciate knowing your method when it comes to determining the number of turns required for the B+ winding(s). I gotta get it right the first time around.

    Regards

    #17861
    Ralph Spracklin
    CVRS Member

    Those first few pics show the set-up I rigged up for my DeWalt 18Volt Portable Drill. It does not look to professional but it works flawlessly. And the mechanical counter works just fine. For now I have just taped a metal bracket to the drill and taped the counter into position, so that each revolution of the drill trips the counter and registers it as one turn. I feed the winding wire by hand, with the supply spool placed on beneath the Bobbin on the floor. Note that the spool sits on a weighted holder. This prevents the spool from tpping over during the winding process. Some of those supply spools have a square end and a round end. Always set the spool round side up to prevent snags which can happen with square side up. Using this method you will need a couple of straps to tie the base of the drill down so that it does not move around or flop over. As you only have two hands, you will need one to control the trigger/switch on the drill while you feed the winding wire on to your Bobbin with the other hand. Make certain the sides of your Bobbin are wide enough so you can prevent your winding wire from spilling over and getting snagged on either the chuck side of the Bobbin or the other side. a situation you don’t want to find your self in.

    NOTE: Should you use the same counter I use, (from Princess Auto) never thy to reverse your drill, This will break the counter. If you need to reverse the drill direction to remove a number of wiring turns by means of the drill, design your Bobbin so that the threaded rod which fits into the drill chuck, protrudes on either side of the Bobbin. Then should you need to reverse the direction of the drill. all you need to do is release your Bobbin axel from the drill and flip it over, placing the other side of the rod axel into the chuck. Also secure the sides of the Bobbin with two nuts on either side, using that second nut as a lock nut to insure that the vibrations do not allow the sides to become loose and ruin your job. I speak from experience on this one. And Oh yes, before you start winding make certain you have a fully charged battery, you don’t want to be changing batteries mid-way through the winding procedure.

    I will make a second Post beneath this one to explain some of the upgrades I have planned for my winding machine.

    I hope this information will benefit yourself and others

    Regards

    Ralph

    #17866
    Ralph Spracklin
    CVRS Member

    OK Andrew
    As I said on my other Post, I have plans to ugrade my winding aparatus. A few weeks back I picked up at the Habitat ReStore, a “Wolfcraft Drill Press Stand” for just six dollars. It is used with an electric drill to power it. It normaly sits in a vertical position requiring just one weighted stand, However I have discovered that this machine will work fine, with a few minor changes and adaptions to be used, along with my Dewalt drill, to be more efficient as a transformer winder.
    I am also looking for a sewing machine motor and foot pedal which I could adapt to it. That would do away with using the drill for power. The great thing about that is, that it will be a winding machine that’s always ready to go. It can also operate to turn quite slow or faster by means of the foot pedal. There is also a adjustment on the Drill Press so as I can adjust the carry from Left to right or from Right to Left, to match the width of any winding. And there is also a lever on it that I will be able to use to more evenly control the the closeness of the winding across the Bobbin. This can and will make the winding more uniform and save valuable winding space, so that when I re-assemble the laminations they will go back in quite easily.
    Will keep you Posted.

    Ralph

    #17897
    Ralph Spracklin
    CVRS Member

    Winding Machine
    Normally I would have posted this in “Show & Tell”, but being that it is related to my transformer project, I have decided to post it here.
    I went out yesterday snooping around the Sally Anne Thrift Shop, I was really looking for a cheap Antique Sewing Machine, with Motor and foot pedal. It was my lucky day. I found one. It was marked for $25.95. However it was discount day and I walked away with it for $13.00. It was already mounted n a heavy home made base.

    Anyway, today I tackled it. First I tested it. It was OK. So I pulled the motor, cleaned it up and mounted it on my Drill press stand, as shown in a previous post. It just screwed to the existing bracket without any modification. and with a little adjustment it lined up, right on centre with the drill chuck shaft. All I have to do now is make a reduction collar 1/4 x 3/8 to connect the motor shaft to the shaft on the chuck. Notice that on the drill chuck is a stainless hose bracket, with the end turned up so that it strikes the lever on the counter on each revolution, which equals one complete turn on the Bobbin for the new winding. I am going to install the sewing machine light on a snorkel, to light up the take-up bobbin. Also on the front of this apparatus, mounted on the base stand I will install a hand rest to steady my wrist. And also that long black handle at the top of the rig allows be to move the new Bobbin to the left or right or visa versa, so that all the right hand has to do is to control the tension on the winding wire. And Oh yes, I have cleaned up the foot pedal and painted it. And I also gave the weighted wooden base a couple of coats of walnut stain. So as they say, it is just about “All Systems Go”

    Regards Ralph

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