Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #10688

    garykuster
    CVRS Member
    #10699

    Sterling Spurrell
    CVRS Member

    Hi from my past experience that if you are going to buy electronic tools for radio repair that you should buy from someone or a company who has went through the equipment and has it electronically restored and calibrated it to ensure you are getting a working tool for the job.

    #10700

    Les Dickson
    CVRS Member

    I wouldn’t spend that much on a tester, especially if it’s not known if it’s functional and calibrated.

    #10703

    garykuster
    CVRS Member

    Thanks for the advice! I will give that one a pass. Update! I couldn’t resist buying it. I will check it over before using.
    Gary

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  garykuster. Reason: Changed mind about buying it
    #10709

    garykuster
    CVRS Member

    I managed to download a schematic and parts list for the Century tube tester and I plan to restore it. Looks pretty straight forward compared to a radio as it seems to be a transformer, a few resistors and condensers to replace, some rotary switches to clean up etc. I don’t think I can go wrong unless the transformer is cooked. It does look like I will need a panel light for the ‘gas’ indicator.

    Gary

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  garykuster. Reason: attachment didn't work
    #10714

    Don Henschel
    CVRS Member

    Actually I wouldn’t worry much over that one Gary as that price isn’t overly expensive IMHO and as you will notice there isn’t much to them other than a mess of sockets. I have a pair of very good Griefkit (my late fathers name for Heathkit equipment he mostly gravitated to) tube testers and while in storage in my possession possibly from slightly high humidity while in a garage the rotory and other switches developed a mild oxidized film but contact cleaner solved this problem. If it has 4 pin and up with all the paperwork for settings it will be most useful. As for calibration one can test an assortment of brand new NOS tubes along with ones appearing to be performing very well in a working set for a comparison. Where I’m looking and are generally very expensive are the testers that can handle CT8 tubes which my early European sets have.

    #10722

    garykuster
    CVRS Member

    Thanks for your input Don. I picked that one as it seemed to cover a wide range of tubes and I have a wide range of old radios. Wow! those euro tubes look quite exotic compared to the North American
    versions. I’m just starting to round up the stuff I’ll need to tackle my old radios. Next up, I need to find a good meter. I’ve always liked Fluke meters, so I’ll have to investigate if they carry the one I need.

    Gary

    #10748

    Don Henschel
    CVRS Member

    Yes the electrickians where I work speak highly of them (Fluke)
    Yes they are quite the tube or valve I have to refer them as arrrrrg! and they were used longer in German sets compared to British. Some Brits chirp about them but I find they snap into the sockets VERY well and tight. Hopefully that tester does Loctals, 3,4,5 pin as well as Octal and of course “Peanut” aka 7&9 pin as well. I have some Ham gear that uses Compactrons as well but that’s a different story being quite late tubes used in that and color TV’s that nobody wants anymore.I also have a Stark tube tester that is most certainly older than I am and I passed half a century 7 years ago. My Stark is a model 9-55 and I have a pair of Heathkit Suitcase style tube/valve ;-0 testers from the early 60’s. Since I’m foolish enough to gravitate to the early to mid 30’s European sets I decided to grab some CT8’s as well and even my Volksempfanger (People’s Radio) VE301Wn has one of them in it as well. My Philco 444 ( British version of People’s Radio) doesn’t have them but that oddball PEN/DD61 but that was easy to find a spare compared to the other flavors. Ah yes a Sieg Heil and British so I guess I’m Phoolish on the Philco and Fanger

    #10760

    garykuster
    CVRS Member

    The tester doesn’t have any 3 or 4 pin sockets (it’s from the mid fifties) but has several adaptor harnesses that may do the trick (I hope) It seems to be able to handle the rest. I always used Fluke 88 meters when I had an Audi/Vw shop and really liked them but they wouldn’t be suitable for radio repairs. If they had a down side, it was the price of the 2 special fuses they required and my techs went through alot of them. After much reading, I think the Fluke 115 will do the trick and is quite reasonable for a Fluke. Maybe I’ll ask Santa.

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