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  • #10053
    Les Dickson
    CVRS Member

    A friend brought over a nice Crosley D-25 that he’s had for a while, but he’d never opened it up to see what shape it was in. When we opened it, the blades of the variable capacitor’s stator were disconnected from the shaft. Any advice on how (if) it’s possible to reconnect these? The photo below shows the cap.

    #10066
    Don Henschel
    Forum Participant

    Hi again Les!
    Since you are in PA there is a radio shop for sale with quite a large “plunder” attached! Other than many parts he also has a number of radios for sale as well. If he is like the radio shop that used to be in my home town I’m sure he will be overwhelmed with shtuff. I prob have some of these around somewhere because when I was in my teens I used to strip down junked radios and TV when they were concidered junk. Unfortunately between the boxes I inherited from my late father who was a Ham and all the crap I have piled up over the years it looks like a Texas Tornado went through. I wonder if one close to what you have could be shoe horned in if it has the same value? Sad to say one local ham that is 87 just sold all of his stuff but at least I got most of his very old tubes! Otherwise I would have asked him but I just found out yesterday he got rid of everything I left.
    Anyway this shop is on 1820 14St.West
    Phone (306) 970-8984 and he is listed as David. I found him on Kijiji listed under Antique Radios.

    #10068
    Les Dickson
    CVRS Member

    Thanks Don. The fellow selling his business on kijiji has been trying to do so for a couple of years. I got an old RCA 641 from him, but he was asking a lot for other items I made an offer on – some old tubes – so I declined. I should visit him again to see if prices have come down. I think he wants to sell it all as one, not that interested in piece by piece.
    When I took a closer look at the tuning capacitor that has the missing blades I discovered that the shaft does not appear to be aligned with the bearings at the back end. As you can see in the attached photos the shaft does not appear to be properly aligned. I’ll need to pull it out and see if it can be fixed. I suspect I will need to get another capacitor to replace it. The blades are missing from the antenna side and the oscillator side so it looks like it’s suffered a serious blow at some time.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by Les Dickson. Reason: One photo was too large so I had to downsize it and add it in
    #10072
    phil
    Forum Participant

    Ive restored a couple of these radios. I think I have several in wait mode. would it be time to pass them along? Ive been out of the loop with Ebay auctions and such. If you’d be interested in taking a few of them on what would be a fair price? I know for sure I have two chartreuse ones, I have a red one that had a chunk missing from the case and thought I might take a mold off one of the good ones then use that to fill in what is missing but Im not sure if they are worth going to that extent. I might have a few more as I can’t seem to pasthem by. I think Ive been collecting then because I like them but how many does one need? I know someone that collected every color and had a whole shelf of the same model. typically the small knobs go missing sometimes the clocks have broken shafts. I had one with a bad IF transformer I think it was silver mica disease. I swapped one from another radio. I doubt if i have any where the gold plating is 100 percent perfect but Ive always liked the style of them. I think I have two or three other crosleys with interesting designs from the same period. I might have too many radios 😉
    Phil in BC

    #10080
    Don Henschel
    Forum Participant

    Judging by the way yours looks I bet they are not as rare as one might think and by that due to the vintage and where they are made this tuner is prob used in many other makes and models? Give me the measurements and perhaps one fellow I know in Saskatchewam might have as he is also into old radios and is a Ham as well. I know I probably have but the pile of boxes including all of my Fathers Heathkit gear leaves me wondering. Actually on a positive side this shouldn’t be that hard to find compared to what I might venture out for, a Loewe Opta Gotland WL with that SCARY but remarkable 3NFL tube. That is a total work of art to say the least. At one glance this set looks like it has 2 tubes but in teairy it has 4. Inside that 3NFL is 3 separate tubes each in their own separate envelopes and let’s not stop there! Also in the same large bottle are capacitors and resistors ALSO in their own envelopes so that the vacuum is not compromised. This was from the early thirties and one can say 80+% of that radio is that 3NFL. A better example which is from the twenties is the OE333 or OE433 where a similar earlier tube is crystal clear so you can see all the critters in there. Simply amazing and it is refered to the first intreregrated circuit ever made. As for that D-25 or as they are refered to as a dashboard radio, they actually fetch a fair dollar on ePain so even if the cabinet needed repair I would say it is still a candidate! Hopefully the Bakelite is one solid color because those Volksempfanger and early SABA I gravitate to have a variation of two colors swirled into the Bakelite not one solid color if they were a solid color blending the repair to the rest with paint or a total repaint would be easy. Ah yes the trouble to go through for a radio with the “verboten Third Reich emblems”! A government gone for almost 80 years and ePain pulls them if you have the Eagle perched on the Swastika displayed or the Reich emblem ink stamp on the Lautschprecher or tubes displayed as well.

    #10081
    Don Henschel
    Forum Participant

    Forgot to mention in my long winded/texted, “slightly” off topic post is how the heck are those plates for each gang held onto the shaft? Are they snapped on? This would not surprise me if they were.

    #10083
    phil
    Forum Participant

    The crosley D-25’s were all painted. You can repair them using epoxy and bondo . I gave mine a basecoat clearcoat and had paint mixed to match the dark metallic blue color. It wasn’t spot on but looked nice. I’d never tried spraying the clearcoat and it was thick and didnt’ want to flow out. eventually I realized I could just build it up and then sand it and polish it wothout going down into the paint. It took a couple of tries with starting all over again until I realized that in order to fill in the “crosley lettering in gold paint what i had to do is really thin the gold paint so it is almost like water. Then I could let it fill the indent with the lettering by pretty much applying it with a toothpick.

    I think I have one crosley that is FM but the armstrong band so I guess that one would receive static now?
    I think these radios are good examples of industrial art and I sometimes wonder if I have an art collection because I certainly don’t’ fall in love with them just because of the great AM stations. -) They must have seemed “space age” back in 1952 I love the style, especially the D-25.

    I think they have a pretty heavy line cord, and should have , because they can run your toaster too with the plug in.. that’s a neat feature. 😉 you can daisy chain all your radios 😉

    I found a philco clock. I was a bit taken aback by it. It isnt’ a radio but a wooden clock made by Philco that has a plug in receptacle to turn your radio on in the morning. I love stuff like that.

    #10108
    Les Dickson
    CVRS Member

    It’s been a week or more since I posted the request and I haven’t had time to get back to the replies I received. Thanks for all the replies. I’m attaching some photos of the tuning cap now that it’s been pulled from the chassis. I haven’t been able to find any specs on the capacitance rating of either section. I don’t see any possible way to reconnect the rotor plates to the shaft. My only hope is that someone has a replacement cap for the Crosley D-25.

    #10112
    phil
    Forum Participant

    its just a guess but it looks like the two capacitor sections that are removed were held to the shaft with a wire clip. If you ignore the fins you have there basically a half a piece of pipe that will fit over the shaft. I bet a wire clip could then be inserted between the fins and it would go down under the shaft as well as up overtop and clip it in against the shaft.

    I have never removed one and I agre you probably have ot look at other AA5’s to try to find the same one or buy a D25 or maybe another crosley, with a broken case to salvage the parts. the knobs on those radios are special to the radio and if lost thee really is no suitable replacement so maybe one without knobs would do as a donor.

    Ill keep looking . I have three of the cheratruse ones, but one has no guts. I know I had a red one and the case was cracked..

    if another tuning cap had a slightly different shape it would probably not work well as it would change the adjustments for bandspread and allignment.

    I remember aligning an old TRF and in it there was a procedure to bend some of the fins. they were cut into segments and bending the fins was how you aligned the different stages which work in conjunction in a TRF. It made me realize that the sections of the tuning cap that were segmented fins were bent for a reason and not to go straightening them unless it was part of an alignment , It also made me realize that the clearances are important to the alignment so if for example one bent some of the outer fins away in a cleaning attempt then it might mess up allignment.

    what i started doing is using canned air or compressed air but maybe not at 100 PSI the I spray alcohol between the air nozzle and the part. this sends the alcohol in through the fins with air pressure. You can use water too. atomizing alcohol or any other flamable material needs to be done with the obvious amount of caution as it certainly is a fire hazard biut I think it’s less likely to damage than sticking strips of cloth or paintbrushes in there. a feather is a good tool.

    I’d havbe a closer look because if I am right then it might not be so hard to bend a piece of springy wire into a C shape. maybe use a piece of a safety pin or somethign like that with some spring to it.
    I thought maybe if you look close between the fins with a flashlight and magnifier.. you might see a little flat or a slot or a scratch or something something down near the bottom of the fins and maybe that would indicate where it might have been? if that’s the case then maybe one could make a hook tool like grind out the edge of a feeler guage so it catches on the clip and that might be a clip removal tool. maybe you could examine another AA5 that you have in pieces to see if that might be the case? if you just need the clip then it might not be worth buying another radio to get a similar tuning cap. Ill check around to see if I might have another radio from the same era to sacrifice that might have a cap.. I dontl know if every maker mae their own but I cant’ see crosley using a bunch of different ones and maybe they were a part crosley bought from some common supplier? I dont think you shoudl give up becauae the parts will surface its just a matter of getting them from a radio that is missing other bits or dropped or something.

    I found the clocks interesting . If you take the motor out you will see it is like a can with a shaft and a gear on it but the motor has no wiring… I looked at mine in complete puzzlement until I realized it is, I guess a synchronous motor and it is run by external field windings.. I knew it wasn’t magic exactly but it is an interesting design.. I had a look at one from a columair and that one had like a spring plate with little notches in the circumference of a washer basically and the frequency of the power acts upon these ridges driving it from the 60 cycle power.. its interesting how it could even work.. then my next realization was the little light coming on ahhh but the 60 cycle power is very carefully controlled by the power companies.. the pulses are very accurate and thats why these clocks keep time so well.. they arent’ relying on a mechanical pendulum.. Ive seen them make a lot of grindy noises and still woirk right.

    if you look at the copper can of the motor you will find there are bumps inthe copper can. You can carefully drill a hole in one or two of these bumps to get oil in. I washed mune out a few times and then put some sort of lube in there. if you do be careful you dont; stick the dril bit right in and cause damage.. I dont; know whats in there , they are a sealed unit so you’d have to wreck one to see inside. luckily many little clock radios use a similar clock movement. How grindey sounding the motor is might indicate it’s life use. Its something to look for because they can seem quite loud if you use them for a bedside radio.

    Phil

    #11809
    aniadeely
    Forum Participant

    Hi..I have never worked on one that was missing the adjustment locking nut. Of course, I have not seen all types but would assume they all pretty much have the same basic design except for the single-gang types designed for communications equipment.

    #11812
    John Greenland
    CVRS Member

    Hi Les,
    I have this sitting on a shelf. It seems to be in reasonably good shape and you are welcome to it if you think that it will work.

    Drop me a note at and I can send you the rest of the dimensions if you are interested.

    TTFN

    John G VO1 CAT

    Attachments:
    #11814
    Don Henschel
    Forum Participant

    I’m still trying to figure out how this would happen in the first place?? I have seen radios that have gone through the mill such as being thrown in the junk pile, laying outside and even ones laying in grass that burned and I have never seen capacitors with the blade sections off the shaft! Even had them laying in junk boxes as well but in that case the gangs were rotated into each other to minimize carnage.

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