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  • #1880
    Bob Horton
    Forum Participant

    Hi

    While I was a subscriber to Canadian Vintage radio in the past I thought the organization had folded up when the newsletters suddenly stopped coming a few years ago. Glad to see it’s still going.

    I have a varied electronics background – everything from aircraft electrician, intercoms, nav-aids technician including ground controlled approach radar, marine radios, etc. I taught radar courses in the RCAF and designed and taught basic electronics and radio servicing at Assiniboine Community college in Brandon, Manitoba. Latterly I was in charge of audio-visual at the college. I have been retired since 1995 and have a few old radios – especially an 1940’s RCA multi-band with a motor driven tuner which I rescued from an old leaky barn.

    Bob Horton
    Brandon, Manitoba

    #1883
    radionut
    Forum Participant

    Hi Bob
    I am 63 and new to this stuff.My dad passed away just over 3 years ago and my mum said all his radio stuff was mine to do what I wished with. Dad wanted to do a museum and I am going to try and do that for him. There is some 400 to 500 in all conditions.I would love to learn how to fix them.I didn’t think this was my hobby but I have fallen for it badly. I am always look for books to help get info from and parts.I do as much as I know and then call brother-in-law and friends for help.Is their any easy books to show how to check voltages and circuits.
    Thanks
    Bruce Ruttan (613-542-3179)

    #1884
    Bob Horton
    Forum Participant

    Hello Bruce

    I came to Assiniboine Community College in 1966. I was, except for a brief stint servicing Radio Equipment and Navigational Aids with the Department of Transport, teaching Radar courses with the RCAF at Clinton, Ontario. I started up and taught the Basic Electronics and Radio Repair Course at Assiniboine Community College in Brandon. While I had been working and teaching Nav Aids (Radar etc.) I was fairly new to consumer products. The book I used and found most helpful was Practical Radio Servicing by William Marcus and Alex Levy. (2nd edition). I am sure you could locate a copy of this on the internet and would be well worth your time and effort. The book deals with both tubes and transistors. At that time we had new students starting every couple of weeks and this book enabled them to get up to speed fairly quickly. For someone beginning to work on old radios I can’t imagine a better source of information. It starts off very basic and covers almost any situation you will come across dealing with old radios – both tube and transistor. I’m 74 and afraid that I feel like a bit of a Luddite now as I have little interest in Ipods and the like. Nearly everything today is not made to be repaired.

    Bob Horton
    Brandon, Manitoba

    Bruce wrote
    Is their any easy books to show how to check voltages and circuits?
    Thanks
    Bruce

    #1885
    radionut
    Forum Participant

    Thank you Bob.I will try and locate those books, as I am eager to learn as I love fixing them. It is such a thrill to hear them go again.I have a Crosley plastic that had a big piece out of the side.Repaired it primed and know have to paint.(this is my first attempt).
    Thank you for the help
    Bruce

    #1891
    Bob Horton
    Forum Participant

    Bruce

    Just an added note. If I remember correctly the third edition was a disappointment. Also I doubt that the first edition deals with transistors which are covered to an adequate degree for older radios that you might be dealing with. Stick the the second edition. I notice quite a few copies on the internet. Thirty or so dollars would not be too much to pay for a copy.

    Bob Horton

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