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  • #10204

    Sterling Spurrell
    CVRS Member

    looking to identify this two piece chassis and no need to ask it has no marking plates at all

    #10207

    John Bartley
    Forum Participant

    General Electric H-31.

    http://radioatticarchives.com/radio.htm?radio=6626

    General Electric H-31

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 4 weeks ago by  John Bartley.
    #10209

    Sterling Spurrell
    CVRS Member

    Too bad I did not have a cabinet for it , I just got in a deal I made. Thanks for the info. Also any idea of the value.

    #10210

    John Bartley
    Forum Participant

    Also any idea of the value.

    I think the audio outputs are 45’s. If they’re still there and in working shape they might get a few bucks, otherwise these sets are almost unwanted. I had a complete, working H31 in nice shape several years ago …. couldn’t sell it in Ottawa … no takers at any price … I parted it out.

    http://pacifictv.ca/schematics/geh31data.pdf

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 4 weeks ago by  John Bartley.
    #10212

    Sterling Spurrell
    CVRS Member

    It has 9 tubes so if they work I am best off keeping it all for parts.

    #10228

    Sterling Spurrell
    CVRS Member

    BUT I WOULD SELL IT IF SOME ONE WANTED IT

    #10248

    phil
    Forum Participant

    probably a good thing to pass on to another collector or look for a similar one to restore knowing you have duplicates of some of the parts. You can keep your eyes open for ones people have converted to liqueur cabinets but then they probably lost the escutcheon or fretwork. You might be able to use it in a chassis of similar age. Its obviously heavy. gravity wasn’t as strong back then 😉

    occasionally you may find a nice cabinet with a problem chassis like a blown transformer or a warped tuning capacitor and you could think of trying to make it fit, perhaps with minor mods.

    It does have the power supply and probably the amp on a separate chassis, the westinghouse columairs were a bit similar often sporting two heavy chassis.

    Ive got a couple of columairs that need restoration and a console of the same era and the console shares the same chassis but I think its already proven to be a GE by the pics above. I don’t know if there was a tie in between the two or if they may have shared some parts. both are probably about 1929. that must have been a big year for consoles as many seem to be that year.
    most radios of the age used the 80 rectifier and 45’s for the push pull amp.

    Its probably not a bad one to restore, easy to get to everything. You might find one with a rusty chassis if you play the waiting game.
    the columairs shared the idea of the backlit tuning dial and there was a n opaque screen where the image of the light shining through the film was displayed. I think there might bea similarity in the big push down binding posts for antenna and ground and the great big coils you see above the chassis.

    Ive seen other TRF radios of about that era where there was lead used to hold the tuning cap fins and then it rubbed when the lead distorted over time. It can sort of swell up and distort the fins as the lead takes on water which isn’t easy to fix. the transformer or speaker winding could go in another set and perhaps be of use in such a case. pots for the volume etc might be of higher values than you see in anything modern and easy to swap from one maker to another of the same era.

    It might not be worth a lot but we should all have a few of these so that parts are available even though they really aren’t easy to get excited about. It would be fine for someone who is getting interested in radios to restore as it can be made to play and one might enjoy seeing the components.. They are in such contrast to new electronics.

    If part of the CVRS agenda is to preserve radio history.. these people of the future will need some parts too so if you have space to hold them and pass them along further in time you may be doing your part even if it is not one you choose to restore.

    #10296

    oldradioman
    Forum Participant

    Also Canadian Westinghouse Model 101 , used also in Grandfather Clock style radio (1931 )

    #10300

    phil
    Forum Participant

    here is the schematic for the 101 which is a columair 10. or might be called a WR10
    I think the 10 might be the size of the speaker?
    I have the columair 10 and I put what chassis I had in it and it wasn’t “quite right” but I made it fit. when I got it it was just the grandfather clock cabinet with the clock and face.

    my brother had a shorter version of the columair, there were several varieties so the chassis I have was the one from hois radio. He wanted to make mods to use the cabinet and I cringed but he pulled the chassis so I restored it to make my columair 10 functional and I had to make a new faceplate fit it.

    the other might be the WR8 I have two of those that need restoring.

    im getting mixed up but the model 80 might be related or that may be the chassis my brother gave me.
    http://www.nostalgiaair.org/pagesbymodel/133/M0030133.pdf

    http://www.nostalgiaair.org/pagesbymodel/088/M0030088.pdf

    #10330

    phil
    Forum Participant

    I copied the type block below which says it was a chassis from a radiola model 82 that was used in the Westinghouse columair 8 or WR-8

    http://idlenot.com/?p=533

    One radio made me particularly sad. I purchased it several years ago from a fellow collector who lived in the suburbs of Boston. It was in his basement. The radio is a 1931 Westinghouse model WR-8, also known as the Columaire. Upon first sight you think that you have found a five foot tall grandfather clock of Art Deco design. Look more closely and you find that the clock movement is an ordinary electric model and is secondary to the piece. The primary focus is the radio. Inside this exquisitely designed cabinet there are two chassis. Together they comprise the power supply and RF deck of the radio. They are almost identical to the internal workings of an RCA Radiola Model 82 radio. Westinghouse got the chassis from RCA and just made those modifications necessary to support it vertically inside a grandfather clock cabinet.

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