Home Forums Electronics Restoration AEG RECTIFIER CANISTER

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  • #25091
    Ralph Spracklin
    Forum Participant

    Evening All
    This pertains to the Black AEG Rectifier/Diode Canister, which sits atop the chassis of my latest project. A NordMende, Arabella, 3D Radio-Phono Console. As the said chassis is in such immaculate condition, I do not want to destroy the look of it. However, I want to view how the internal Diodes are wired up. The problem being that, while there just four diodes forming the rectifier bridge, there are five wiring leads coming from it. Yet the schematic only accounts for four leads. So my question is, what is the fifth lead for? Further checking may reveal where it may connect within the Power Supply itself, but that may not tell me how the wiring inside the can is set-up. My second question is will the use of four IN4007 Diodes be suffice to do the job. Any thoughts on this?

    https://nvhrbiblio.nl/schema/Nordmende_Tannhauser59.pdf

    Ralph

    #25114
    John Greenland
    CVRS Member

    Hey Ralph,

    Personally , I gave up on the 4000 series of diodes and now for most any thing power supply related I use the 5400 series.

    Just a bit more current handling , just in case .

    Regards, John G.

    #25116
    Ralph Spracklin
    Forum Participant

    Hey John

    Thanks for Replying. What do you think of these units. Available from Amazon. Full Bridge Silicone Rectifiers. I suppose you would call them a Mosfet. Good for a 1000Volt AC. They come ready to mount in chassis. And professional looking indeed. Seems to me to be a No-Brainer, at less than $6.00 each and as I said, ready to go. Any thoughts on that fifth wire set-up. Bcause as you know a full Bridge requires only four connections, which includes the ground. And speaking of grounds, I am thinking it may be a second reinforced ground for the can itself???. I have not yet had a chance to examine the chassis wiring. The way it is wired into the chassis maybe give me a clue.

    Regards

    #25118
    Ralph Spracklin
    Forum Participant

    Sorry John

    Apparantly Kindle prevents me from posting pic of said Mosfet. Just Google Amazon KBPC3510. should show pic of these units.

    Ralph

    #25119
    John Greenland
    CVRS Member

    Ralph,
    I have used a similar unit for hi current supplies that I have repaired for friends. Are you sure you need the amperage that these are capable of carrying ?

    #25123
    Ralph Spracklin
    Forum Participant

    John
    Further checking of the chassis, shows that someone has messed around with the wiring of the present Rectifier and tied together the two Yellow wires from each side. of the rectifier set-up it self. What else I do not know, but I will eventually find out. So I will assemble a new one and install it, cutting out the original AEG canister all together.
    Having checked out all the specs on different Silicone Diodes, I agree that these, 5000 Series Diodes are a better choice to use. I am going out shortly to see if I can find, locally, somewhere that I can purchase some 5000 Series Silicone Diodes. Maybe I will get lucky at the Source, but I doubt it. If not there is always Amazon. I use to depend on Sayal Electronics, for things I needed in a hurry, but since they closed down the store in Barrie, I find it takes to much time and fuel to go to the Vaughn store, which depending on traffic can take the best part of an hour, one way. And in this case, it would result in some very expensive diodes.

    Ralph

    #25185
    Ralph Spracklin
    Forum Participant

    Hey John and all
    I ordered a bunch of the 1N5000 series,diodes and rebuilt the Rectifier. I think that using 1N5000 series was the right choice. Thanks for the suggestion John.

    This German, Arabella 58 set was indeed a challenge. It was taxing my troubleshooting skills to the limit. I’d fix one problem, only to find there is yet another hurdle to overcome. Somebody in the past had messed around with this set and lost their way, although their soldering skills were excellent. At first I was having a problem, where only the FM Module tube was warming up. I solved the problem with that, only to find out that I had the Push Pull Output tubes were notburning as hot as they normally should be. Heater voltage being pulled down. Then I discovered that the ECC82 tube, which is a dual triode, was running very cold, with no sign of receiving power. My question was why is this happening? Well here is what I discovered. What I thought was an ECC82 tube, had been substituted with a 12AU7 tube, which, by the way, is an Identical tube, both of course have the 12 volt designation. As I never ran into a tube line-up where all tube filaments, which had only a 6.3 Volt supply from the Power Transformer, so I wondered why there would be a 12 Volt tube in the line-up. In my mind this would explain why the tube would run cold.. I did not realize at the time, that this 12AU7 had a three pin filament set-up, which allowed it to be also run as a Six Volt Tube. So here’s the grabber, in order to use it in a Six Volt filament tube line-up, one has to utilize that third Filament Pin (Pin 9) on those two mentioned tubes, which allowed it to function as a Centre Tap, between the two internal split filaments, connecting them in parallel, thus acting as a single 6 Volt Filament, with a 300 mA draw. Of course by leaving the number 9 pin open, those tubes would operate as a 12 volt filament. Such anomalies do arise in the world of radio restoration, but this one had thrown me for a looper.

    Two days later and the radio is now working fine, although I still have to lubricate the turn table assembly, and touch-up the Cabinet. I did not have replace, even one of the Capacitors or Resistors, or tubes on this unit. I was glad about that as there were easily around three hundred of these compoments used in this chassis. It had the potential of being one expensive restoration. Total cost to me in parts, $20.00.

    Ralph

    #25200
    Ralph Spracklin
    Forum Participant

    Hey John and all
    I ordered a bunch of the 1N5000 series,diodes and rebuilt the Rectifier. I think that using 1N5000 series was the right choice. Thanks for the suggestion John.

    This German, Arabella 58 set was indeed a challenge. It was taxing my troubleshooting skills to the limit. I’d fix one problem, only to find there is yet another hurdle to overcome. Somebody in the past had messed around with this set and lost their way, although their soldering skills were excellent. At first I was having a problem, where only the FM Module tube was warming up. I solved the problem with that, only to find out that I had the Push Pull Output tubes were notburning as hot as they normally should be. Heater voltage being pulled down. Then I discovered that the ECC82 tube, which is a dual triode, was running very cold, with no sign of receiving power. My question was why is this happening? Well here is what I discovered. What I thought was an ECC82 tube, had been substituted with a 12AU7 tube, which, by the way, is an Identical tube, both of course have the 12 volt designation. As I never ran into a tube line-up where all tube filaments, which had only a 6.3 Volt supply from the Power Transformer, so I wondered why there would be a 12 Volt tube in the line-up. In my mind this would explain why the tube would run cold.. I did not realize at the time, that this 12AU7 had a three pin filament set-up, which allowed it to be also run as a Six Volt Tube. So here’s the grabber, in order to use it in a Six Volt filament tube line-up, one has to utilize that third Filament Pin (Pin 9) on those two mentioned tubes, which allowed it to function as a Centre Tap, between the two internal split filaments, connecting them in parallel, thus acting as a single 6 Volt Filament, with a 300 mA draw. Of course by leaving the number 9 pin open, those tubes would operate as a 12 volt filament. Such anomalies do arise in the world of radio restoration, but this one had thrown me for a looper.

    Two days later and the radio is now working fine, although I still have to lubricate the turn table assembly, and touch-up the Cabinet. I did not have replace, even one of the Capacitors or Resistors, or tubes on this unit. I was glad about that as there were easily around three hundred of these compoments used in this chassis. It had the potential of being one expensive restoration. Total cost to me in parts, $20.00.

    Ralph

    #25367
    johngillespie
    CVRS Member

    Hi Ralph
    I’ve restored a number of these Nordmende radios over the years. Always replaced the AEC rectifiers. My thoughts are that the components used in these radios were pretty decent quality, if memory serves, I only replaced capacitors in one, and only because the customer requested it. My complaint with European radios has always been exposed fuse terminals mounted on the power transformers and oxidized switches. We have one here that likes to play FM, if we try to select AM it takes many tries until the oxidation lets go. It can be frustrating even for me… a customer wouldn’t tolerate it for a second. I’ve tried deoxit, etc. over the years, it helps for a while, but the problem always returns. Radio and record player plays fantastic, gorgeous sound, but that annoying switch drives me bonkers!
    John

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